This starter on planning (phase 1) an essay on inclusion of ‘protest art’ in art-history’? Is that really desirable?

TMA04: “Using no more than 2000 words answer the following: Taking one of the three case studies in Section 1 of Block 4 as your starting point, and drawing on your work on the block as a whole, you should formulate a research question related to an aspect of the overall Section 1 theme, ‘Towards … More This starter on planning (phase 1) an essay on inclusion of ‘protest art’ in art-history’? Is that really desirable?

‘But when I think Oh William!, don’t I mean Oh Lucy too? / Don’t I mean Oh Everyone, Oh dear Everybody in this whole wide world, we do not know anybody, not even ourselves!’ This blog is about Elizabeth Strout (2021) ‘Oh William!’: BOOKER REVIEW.

‘But when I think Oh William!, don’t I mean Oh Lucy too? / Don’t I mean Oh Everyone, Oh dear Everybody in this whole wide world, we do not know anybody, not even ourselves!’[1] This blog is about Elizabeth Strout (2021) ‘Oh William!’, New York & London, Viking, Penguin Books. Note that it CONTAINS SPOILERS: … More ‘But when I think Oh William!, don’t I mean Oh Lucy too? / Don’t I mean Oh Everyone, Oh dear Everybody in this whole wide world, we do not know anybody, not even ourselves!’ This blog is about Elizabeth Strout (2021) ‘Oh William!’: BOOKER REVIEW.

‘You want to ask the universe what everyone else wants to ask the universe. Why are we born, why do we die, why anything has to be. And all the universe has to say in reply is: I don’t know, arsehole, stop asking. … So we make up stories because we’re afraid of the dark’. This blog contains my personal views of Shehan Karunatilaka’s (2022) ‘The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida’ @ShehanKaru info.

 ‘You want to ask the universe what everyone else wants to ask the universe. Why are we born, why do we die, why anything has to be. And all the universe has to say in reply is: I don’t know, arsehole, stop asking. The Afterlife is as confusing as the Before Death, the In Between … More ‘You want to ask the universe what everyone else wants to ask the universe. Why are we born, why do we die, why anything has to be. And all the universe has to say in reply is: I don’t know, arsehole, stop asking. … So we make up stories because we’re afraid of the dark’. This blog contains my personal views of Shehan Karunatilaka’s (2022) ‘The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida’ @ShehanKaru info.

‘…, it seemed as if her anatomical nightmares had begun to bleed into the days’.[1] This blog contains my personal views of Maddie Mortimer’s (2022) ‘Maps of Our Spectacular Bodies’, BOOKER Reflections LONGLIST 2022.

BOOKER REFLECTIONS LONGLIST 2022: ‘…, it seemed as if her anatomical nightmares had begun to bleed into the days’.[1] This blog contains my personal views of Maddie Mortimer’s (2022) Maps of Our Spectacular Bodies, London, Picador. This blog CONTAINS SPOILERS so do not read if you do not like that. Figure 1: This book took … More ‘…, it seemed as if her anatomical nightmares had begun to bleed into the days’.[1] This blog contains my personal views of Maddie Mortimer’s (2022) ‘Maps of Our Spectacular Bodies’, BOOKER Reflections LONGLIST 2022.

BOOKER REFLECTIONS LONGLIST 2022: ‘”Who? What? Said the man. “Is there a difference?” This blog contains my personal views of Alan Garner’s (2021) ‘Treacle Walker’.

BOOKER REFLECTIONS SHORTLIST 2022: ‘“Who? What? Said the man. “Is there a difference?” ’[1] This blog contains my personal views of Alan Garner’s (2021) Treacle Walker London, 4th Estate. Some readers of Alan Garner seem to be clear about who, or what, this novel is about. Reviewers for The Guardian (Alex Preston) and The Observer … More BOOKER REFLECTIONS LONGLIST 2022: ‘”Who? What? Said the man. “Is there a difference?” This blog contains my personal views of Alan Garner’s (2021) ‘Treacle Walker’.

Arinze Ifeakandu describes the discovery of his amative preferences when he was ‘a little boy’ thus: ‘But it was boys who made my heart go wild. Boys were incredibly beautiful to me, not in the way that girls were—… Boys, I wanted to hold. Soon, I began to write stories that satisfied this longing, especially as I began allowing myself freedom to be with, and think of, boys. Representing that love was my way of perhaps participating in something my heterosexual peers enjoyed without second thoughts’. This blog reflects on Arinze Ifeakandu’s (2022) ‘God’s Children Are Little Broken Things’ and previews an interview of him with Colm Tóibín on the 24th August 2022.

Arinze Ifeakandu describes the discovery of his amative preferences when he was ‘a little boy’ thus: ‘But it was boys who made my heart go wild. Boys were incredibly beautiful to me, not in the way that girls were—girls were beautiful in factual ways: fine girl. Boys, I wanted to hold. Soon, I began to … More Arinze Ifeakandu describes the discovery of his amative preferences when he was ‘a little boy’ thus: ‘But it was boys who made my heart go wild. Boys were incredibly beautiful to me, not in the way that girls were—… Boys, I wanted to hold. Soon, I began to write stories that satisfied this longing, especially as I began allowing myself freedom to be with, and think of, boys. Representing that love was my way of perhaps participating in something my heterosexual peers enjoyed without second thoughts’. This blog reflects on Arinze Ifeakandu’s (2022) ‘God’s Children Are Little Broken Things’ and previews an interview of him with Colm Tóibín on the 24th August 2022.

‘The rattling in my head began to fade. It would return, of course, … but I grew better at recognising it for what it was: a need to stop and admire the view’. This blog reflects on why we sometimes might need the differentiated paces of the semi-graphic novel to get made. It uses an excellent example by Lizzy Stewart (2022) ‘Alison’.

‘The rattling in my head began to fade. It would return, of course, … but I grew better at recognising it for what it was: a need to stop and admire the view’.[1] This blog reflects on why we sometimes might need the differentiated paces of the semi-graphic novel to get made. It uses an … More ‘The rattling in my head began to fade. It would return, of course, … but I grew better at recognising it for what it was: a need to stop and admire the view’. This blog reflects on why we sometimes might need the differentiated paces of the semi-graphic novel to get made. It uses an excellent example by Lizzy Stewart (2022) ‘Alison’.

‘Sometimes I would wake then, not knowing how the dream ended. Other times I would see a diver near the surface, his silhouette like an angel a mile above us, and then I noticed or knew somehow that it was myself, or some future version of myself that had come to tell me something, to save me, perhaps to tell me a secret, to assure me that all this would mean something in the end’. This blog reflects on a recent memoir by poet Seán Hewitt (2022) ‘All Down Darkness Wide’

‘Sometimes I would wake then, not knowing how the dream ended. Other times I would see a diver near the surface, his silhouette like an angel a mile above us, and then I noticed or knew somehow that it was myself, or some future version of myself that had come to tell me something, to … More ‘Sometimes I would wake then, not knowing how the dream ended. Other times I would see a diver near the surface, his silhouette like an angel a mile above us, and then I noticed or knew somehow that it was myself, or some future version of myself that had come to tell me something, to save me, perhaps to tell me a secret, to assure me that all this would mean something in the end’. This blog reflects on a recent memoir by poet Seán Hewitt (2022) ‘All Down Darkness Wide’

2022 Booker Longlist – The Books I read this year (to be updated as & when. Personal views only).

2022 Booker Longlist – The Books I read this year. I’m aiming to keep these lower – certainly than the full list but maybe considerably lower than that. In previous year’s I blogged the full list. Here’s the Longlist – and how I’ll record my adventures with it: Bought (B) Borrowed (A) Not or Not … More 2022 Booker Longlist – The Books I read this year (to be updated as & when. Personal views only).

In a Foreword to a book relating to an exhibition based on David Hockney’s stimulus to the academic world to revise its boundaries, in the history of art at least, Alan Bookbinder and Luke Syson say that the ‘project demonstrates that the phenomena of seeing and experiencing are germane to both science and art’. They go on to claim it represents ‘easing’ between these academic disciplinary borders that will, by ‘cross-pollination of ideas and innovation help us all look differently at the world we inhabit’. This blog reflects on a much needed attempt to examine seriously and with respect the ‘Hockney thesis’ in the 2022 book of the exhibition edited by Martin Gayford, Martin Kemp and Jane Munro ‘Hockney’s Eye: The Art and Technology of Depiction’

In a Foreword to a book relating to an exhibition based on David Hockney’s stimulus to the academic world to revise its boundaries, in the history of art at least, Alan Bookbinder and Luke Syson say that the ‘project demonstrates that the phenomena of seeing and experiencing are germane to both science and art’. They … More In a Foreword to a book relating to an exhibition based on David Hockney’s stimulus to the academic world to revise its boundaries, in the history of art at least, Alan Bookbinder and Luke Syson say that the ‘project demonstrates that the phenomena of seeing and experiencing are germane to both science and art’. They go on to claim it represents ‘easing’ between these academic disciplinary borders that will, by ‘cross-pollination of ideas and innovation help us all look differently at the world we inhabit’. This blog reflects on a much needed attempt to examine seriously and with respect the ‘Hockney thesis’ in the 2022 book of the exhibition edited by Martin Gayford, Martin Kemp and Jane Munro ‘Hockney’s Eye: The Art and Technology of Depiction’

Rhys sought to ‘distance herself from the women whom she wrote in her novels. While agreeing that they often underwent similar experiences to their author, and bore an acknowledged resemblance to aspects of her personality, Rhys pointed to a crucial difference. They were victims. She herself was not’. This blog reflects on the high quality of a biography by Miranda Seymour (2022) ‘I Used To Live Here Once: The Haunted Life of Jean Rhys’

Interviewed in 1969 for The Observer, Rhys sought to ‘distance herself from the women whom she wrote in her novels. While agreeing that they often underwent similar experiences to their author, and bore an acknowledged resemblance to aspects of her personality, Rhys pointed to a crucial difference. They were victims. She herself was not’.[1] This … More Rhys sought to ‘distance herself from the women whom she wrote in her novels. While agreeing that they often underwent similar experiences to their author, and bore an acknowledged resemblance to aspects of her personality, Rhys pointed to a crucial difference. They were victims. She herself was not’. This blog reflects on the high quality of a biography by Miranda Seymour (2022) ‘I Used To Live Here Once: The Haunted Life of Jean Rhys’

Ian Massey helps us to see again the power of Patrick Procktor’s intelligent defence of an aspect of painting that the artist named ‘theatrical’. Procktor’s summary of what was required in the development of modern painting was to say: “It is the expressive possibilities of the imagination which need to be extended.”’[1]  This blog uses Ian Massey’s (2010) ‘Patrick Procktor: Art and Life’

Ian Massey, in his superb but sadly out-of-print monograph of Patrick Procktor, helps us to see again the power of this artist’s intelligent defence of an aspect of painting that the artist named ‘theatrical’. It re-opens a perspective on art that is no longer represented in mainstream art history, or is perhaps actively suppressed. For … More Ian Massey helps us to see again the power of Patrick Procktor’s intelligent defence of an aspect of painting that the artist named ‘theatrical’. Procktor’s summary of what was required in the development of modern painting was to say: “It is the expressive possibilities of the imagination which need to be extended.”’[1]  This blog uses Ian Massey’s (2010) ‘Patrick Procktor: Art and Life’

‘I did more research on Alan Cumming for the writing of this book than I have ever done for any character I have ever portrayed’. This blog looks at why I booked to see Alan Cumming at the 2022 Edinburgh Book Festival on Sunday 21st August. It uses … my reading of a recent memoir (his second) by Alan Cumming [2021] ‘Baggage: Tales From A Packed Life’ (pictured).

‘I did more research on Alan Cumming for the writing of this book than I have ever done for any character I have ever portrayed’.[1] This blog focuses implicitly on the fascination readers and festival goers seem to have for observing celebrity (or ‘seeing stars’) and reading their ‘stories’.  This blog looks at why I … More ‘I did more research on Alan Cumming for the writing of this book than I have ever done for any character I have ever portrayed’. This blog looks at why I booked to see Alan Cumming at the 2022 Edinburgh Book Festival on Sunday 21st August. It uses … my reading of a recent memoir (his second) by Alan Cumming [2021] ‘Baggage: Tales From A Packed Life’ (pictured).